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merchant ship stability

   This book dealing with the stability of the merchant vessels was written by H. J. Pursley, formerly lecturer to the School of Navigation of the University of Southampton, and revised by J. Wardle, Extra Master. We are all aware of the significant changes that have been made to the approach to the stability of the ships, and these changes did affect merchant vessels. For example, examination requirements considerably increased, the metric units were introduces; in addition to that, the recommendations have been produced for a standard method of presenting/using stability info. In this 7th release of the book all above stated changes were considered and the publication meets all those requirements. Some of the basic information is retained in order to be of some use for the readers who are not familiar with the subject. However, the rest of the text is expanded and re-arranged. The authors of the book did their best to carefully link the theoretical information contained within the book with practice with the particular attention being paid to the matters which might be not fully appreciated by seamen. It is a good and useful publication providing seamen with the basic knowledge without making them go too deep into the theory of naval architecture.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2070 | | Comments (0)

A Guide to Fishing Vessel Stability

   This Guide released by the Maritime New Zealand is fully dedicated to the stability of the fishing vessels. The stability is something which the life of every fisher depends on and that is why this is of the critical importance. The ship must always be kept safe abd stable. Even if the vessel is safe and complyin with all the applicable rules and regulations, poor operational decisions can easily cause it to capsize. The present publication was developed with the sole intention to help people better understand the key elements influencing ship stability as well as the critical hazards that fishing ships are exposed to. Thorough understanding of the factors that reduce stability will help them make the proper decisions and take the right actions to keep their vessels safe. The book is divided in two big parts - the first one explains the importance of stability while the second one addresses the stability hazards.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1077 | | Comments (0)

Actual Ships Stability Problems and the Influence on Safety of Navigation

   The author highlights the importance of ship's stability, provides some historical background and alalysis of the regularions concerning intact stability, describes the failure modes including ones on ships operating in severe sea conditions, and sheds some light on the steps for future improvements of stability assessment. He approaches the loss of ship stability problem by studying the operational aspects together with analysing the dinamic ship behaviour, offering a clear picture of the failure modes not yet covered by any stability criteria or regulation. The information and research results contained in this publication will of course be useful for the students of naval architecture as well as for the industry professionals.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1067 | | Comments (0)

The Geometry of Ships

   Here is another publication belonging to the Principles of Naval Architecture Series. This book was written by John Letcher and edited by J. Randolph Paulling. It comes without saying that the geometry of most ship hull forms ranging from smallest yachts to the huge vessels are now developed by means of one of the commercially available software packages for ship hull modeling. Such programs include stability and all other hull properties and they may form a part of a comprehensive CBD (computer-based design) and manufacturing system; alternatively, they may be included in a shipboard computer-based operational systems that are used for cargo load monitoring and damage control. This book is intended to present the theoretical basis for the hull modeling systems statae above and the procedures for computing hull geometric and buoyancy properties using mathematical methods. The emphasis in this book has been made upon the fundamentals and nomenclature underlying several methods of hull geometrical modeling with the ultimate aim to provide the understanding required to use intelligently both existing and future modeling tools...

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2012 | | Comments (0)

Stability and Safety of Ships - Risk of Capsizing   The appearance of new types of naval and commercial vessels with unconventional dynamics in waves made conventional methods of evaluation of dynamic stability unreliable for the most part, as these methods are based on previous experience and statistics. It is well known that the best approach is to use the physically sound solution for ship motion in waves employing Nonlinear Dynamics and theory of stochastic processes. This allows developing new views on different types of stability failures including capsizing in dead ship conditions, surf-riding and broaching, parametric resonance and pure loss of stability on the wave crest. The above approach has defined the increased interest of maritime industry to the problems of ship dynamics. Understanding the importance of these problems motivated IMO to resume discussion on new approaches to intact stability regulations in 2002...

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1321 | | Comments (0)

Vibration

   Much was accomplished in the 1970s and 1980s in improving the technology for designing ships for avoidance of excessive vibration. Because of this, as well as because of the downturn in ship production in the West, research and development in ship vibration experienced hiatus in the 1990s. It will therefore be seen that many of the reference sources cited in the previous edition of this chapter are retained in this edition. This is partially a natural consequence of fundamentally important basic material that serves as building blocks and never changes. New material is inserted where appropriate, but engineering technology that matured in the late 1980s is still mostly very representative of the state-of-the-art of ship vibration. An example of the capability for achievement of vibration control that emerged from the 1980s was the success of the European cruise ship development programs of the 1990s. Vibration avoidance is a crucial issue with cruise ships laden with sensitive customers. The success wras achieved via innovation gained by placing engine rooms out of the immediate stern region to improve stern lines for lowr wake gradients, and employing electric drive with the electric motors in articulating podded-propulsors, thereby avoiding the wake of shaft and bearing "shadows" shed into the propeller disk from forward...

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1906 | | Comments (0)

Ship Resistance and Flow

   More than twenty years elapsed since the date of the publication of the previous edition of world famous and popular Principles of Naval Architecture. During this time there have been so many remarkable advances in the science and practice of the design and construction of vessels as well as other floating structures. In the previous edition of the book, not too much attention was paid to the increasing use of computers and various computational methods. Nowadays, computers are very important tools in any kind of engineering environment. Some advanced methods and concepts that were under development at that time are the important part of common engineering practice of today. These methods include computational fluid dynamics, numerical modeling, final element analysis, etc., providing naval architects with unprecedented power and flexibility to explore innovation in design and concept of marine systems...

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2713 | | Comments (0)

Intact Stability

   In this latest, revised edition of "Principles of Naval Architecture", the basic principles of intact ship stability in calm water have been developed - starting from IS at small angles of inclination then proceeding to larger heel angles. Different effects on the vessel stability have been addressed in the book, such as changes in the geometry of hull, distribution of weight, suspended weights and partial support due to drydocking or grounding, free surfaces of liquids in tanks. Stability criteria and rules such as those established by the IMO, the United States Coast Guard, and some other recognized regulatory bodies including United States Navy have been presented with brief discussion of their physical bases and underlying assumptions. A discussion of evolving probabilistic and dynamic stability criteria has been included. Special attention has been paid to the background and bases of the stability rules to make sure that the naval architects may more clearly understand their scope as well as limitations and reliability in insuring ship safety and adequate stability.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2444 | | Comments (0)

Creating Shapes in Civil and Naval Architecture

   This book is based on the essential results of a Workshop held on December 7 to 9, 2006 at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG) in Berlin on the subject of "Creating Shapes in Civil and Naval Architecture: A Cross-Disciplinary Comparison". It presents the final version of 14 articles presented there and 4 relevant Appendices. The meeting in Berlin was held to lay certain foundations in a comparative study of the knowledge history in two related disciplines» Civil Architecture and Naval Architecture. Civil Architecture deals with the conception» design and realization of terrestrial buldings, Naval Architecture treats the corresponding tasks for floating, maritime structures. The two disciplines throughout their history have been sharing certain organizational objectives» technical methods and tools. Both aspire to create complex, multifunctional objects» though for different sets of functional requirements and operational environments. It is therefore legitimate to ask how much common ground do the two architectures share also in their knowledge histories. Which are their sources of knowledge genesis» how did their knowledge grow and migrate, how did they exchange any knowledge, did they influence each other or inherit common knowledge from other sources, was there any significant dialogue, both with respect to practical processes and methodical concepts? In short, with respect to their knowledge domains, were they more like twin sisters or more like distant cousins?..

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1330 | | Comments (0)

The Aero- and Hydromechanics of Keel Yachts

   The intended reader will already have found out that this is not a book with glossy pictures by Beken of Cowes of the glamorous and fabulous sailing yachts of the world. It is a lot more sober and a little more scientific than that. This book has come about as a follow-up on a course on the aero- and hydromechanics of sailing that was written by the author for the Heiner Sail Academy in the Netherlands in 2002/2003. The piupose of the course was to provide yachtsmen with (top-)amateur or (semi-) professional racing ambitions with a solid background of the aero- and hydromechanics of sailing. The ambition of the author was to do so in a manner that he could justify from his own background as a professional fluid dynamicist and a cruising yachtsman, while trying to keep the material accessible for attendees without profound academic schooling. This, of course, is not the first book on the aero- and hydromechanics of sailing. A.C. Marchaj's "Aero- hydrodynamics of sailing" is generally considered as "The Bible' on the science and technology of sailing. And lightly so: it contains an incredibly broad and deep treatment of almost all aspects of sailing technology. Many readers, however, may find it difficult to find then way in Marchaj's book, in particular if their objective is to find out in a relatively straightforward way about how and why sail boat performance depends on the configuration and trim of boat and sails. While working on this book a new. very valuable volume on the science behind sailing yachts and their design appeared on the horizon: Fabio Fossati"s "Aero-Hydrodynamics and the Performance of Sailing Yachts". Fossati's book provides an excellent description of the state of the art of fluid dynamic technology as applied to sailing yachts. It also addresses the physical mechanisms of sailing in considerable depth.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1636 | | Comments (0)

Principles of Naval Architecture Vol. 3

   And this is the third and the last volume of the Principles of Naval Architecture set. This part is dedicated to the Motions in Waves and Controllability. Among the issues addressed there are ocean waves, ship's responses to regular waves and derived responses, control of ships motions, various design aspects, assessing vessel seaway performance, the control loop, and basic linear and non-linear equations of motion, analysis of coursekeeping, control-fixed stability and turning ability, model tests, theoretical prediction of hydrodynamic coefficients and systems identification, accelerating, stopping, backing, automated control systems, environment effects, ship waterway interactions, and many more.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 4163 | | Comments (0)

Principles of Naval Architecture Vol. 2

   Here is the second of the three volumes of the Princilpes of naval Architecture by Edward Lewis. This volume includes three major chapters addressing Ship's Resistance (dimensional analysis, frictional and wave-making resistance, other components of resistance, the uses of models for determining the resistance of the ship and various methods of reseting model data, relation of the vessel hull's form to the resistance, HSC and advance marine vehicles), Propulsion powering of ships, propeller theory and design, interaction between propeller and ships hull, cavitation, types of propellers), and Vibration (theory and concepts, design and analysis, criteria and measurements etc.).

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2423 | | Comments (0)

Principles of Naval Architecture Vol. 1

   Here is one of the most popular and classic textbooks on the naval architecture. We would rate it as a definite necessity for any naval architect who works in the marine industry. This set includes mountains of useful information which is required by the naval architect. The basic objective of this third (revised) edition of the book, is to provide readers, i.e. both students and active industry professionals with a timely survey of all basic principles in the field of Naval Architecture - the authors did their best to make clear that engineering and research in almost all branches of the subject. This publication must be ofn the reference bookshelf of every practicing naval architect. The set comprises of three volumes. This first volume consists of four chapters addressing the Ship Geometry, Intact Stability, Subdivision and Damage Stability, and Strength of Ships.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 4148 | | Comments (0)

Ship stability for masters and mates   This is a very well estanblished naval architecture handbook which was completely updated abd reviewed by a new author in order to ensure a modern coverage of its contepth in depth. The introductpry part of the publication was fully re-written, it now provides the ships topes together with the general characteristics which helps readers understand the typical sizes of the merchant ships of today. This new edition includes for new chapters covering the deadweight scale, ship squat, trim and stability book, and the interaction. One of the newly added appendices deals with the draft surveys.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 4221 | | Comments (0)

Principles of Naval Engineering

   This text is aimed to the marine engineering officers. The original intention of the authors was to provide the engineers with the fundamentals of ship machinery and equipment as well as give some introductory information on the their design and theory. Some description of the development of naval ships, basics of naval architecture, damage control, ship design and construction have also been given in this publication by the Bureau of Naval Personnel. Of course, the main aim was to help students to get the clear overall view of the shipboard engineering plants and make them understand the basic theoretical considerations underlying the design of the shipboard machinery and engine room equipment.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1875 | | Comments (0)

Text-book of Theoretical Naval Architecture   Here is a reprint of one of the most popular and classical textbooks on the naval architecture in the history. The text was digitized by the Internet Archive some years ago with funding from Microsoft Corporation. The publication was prepared by Edward Lewis Attwood and published by Longmans, Green & Co. almost one century ago. The intention of the author was to provide readers, particularly draughtsmen of the Naval Achitects and Shipbuilders offices and future naval architects studing this discipline, with a thorough and comprehensive text book containing proper and understandable explanations of the calculations involved. There is a huge number of examples given in the book for the students to be able to test their grasp of the principles and processes explained inside...

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1536 | | Comments (0)

Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics

   The authors of this publication assessed the latest developments in CFD, i.e. computational fluid dynamics and provided necessary guidance for further researches in this field. Here are the main chapters - Introduction; Recommendations and conclusions; Evaluation of ship resistance, trim and sinkage, self-propulsion and prediction of wave pattern; Evaluation of local flow and seakeeping prediction; A verification and validation study based on ship resistance submissions; Some additional data for resistance, sinkage and trim; Post workshop analysis and computations for KVLCC2 and 5415.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1576 | | Comments (0)

Contemporary Ideas on Ship Stability and Capsizing in Waves

   This book written by a team of authors covers the latest ideas regarding the stability of ships and their capsizing in waves. Here is the contents - Applications of fluid mechanics; Ship stability criteria; Intact vessel stability; Parametric rolling; Broaching-to; Non-linear dynamics and capsizing of ships; Roll damping; Probabilistic assessment of ship capsize; Environmental modeling; Stability of the damaged ship; CFD applications to ship stability; Design for safety; Stability of naval vessels; Accident investigations.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1434 | | Comments (0)

Kite Dynamics for Ship Propulsion

   Kites have hitherto been the subject of a low volume of research for ship propulsion and electric power production, but are now receiving growing interest in view of these commercial applications. Recent developments for ship propulsion, such as in autopilot kite control and in launch and recovery systems have enabled them to be used commercially for trans-oceanic voyages, yielding financial savings through reduced fuel costs. Alongside yielding financial savings for ship operators, the use of kite power helps minimise the harmful effect that shipping has on the environment. These benefits are achieved using the wind; an entirely renewable energy source which is in abundant supply for a large proportion of the world's oceans. Kites are one method that can be used for capturing this abundant energy supply at altitude. This thesis investigates the performance of kites from a technical perspective, and thus enables the calculation of potential fuel savings, and likely profitability of this type of ship propulsion system. Particular emphasis is given to obtaining an understanding of the kite dynamics because the literature surrounding this aspect of the wider propulsion problem is relatively sparse.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 923 | | Comments (0)

Ice Induced Resistance of Ship Hulls

   Introduction; Description of sea ice characteristics; KV Svalbald; Models for calculating ice induced resistance for ship hulls; Estimation of ship resistance from measurements; Data selection; Open water resistance; Statistical analysis; Result discussion; Further work; References; Appendix - MatLab calculations; Sensitivity of parameters in resistance formulation; Scatterplots of divided data; Lognormal probability for Lindqvist and Riska formulations.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 990 | | Comments (0)

Added masses of ship structures   It is very important to know the added body masses interacting with the fuel for different research and applied tasks of hydromechanics. This treatise contains data on added masses on ships and other floating objects. Additionally, many theoretical and experimental methods used for determining added masses are described in the book. Most of the materials are presented in formulas and plots convenient for practical use.

 

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1353 | | Comments (0)

Water Waves and Ship Hydrodynamics

   Theory of water waves; Linear wave phenomena; Boundary integral formulation and ship motions; Second-order thepry; Asymptotic formulation; Flexible floating platform; Irregular and non-linear waves; Shallow water ship hydrodynamics; Appendices- mathematcical methods.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 1364 | | Comments (0)

Submarine Hydrodynamics

   Submarines are very specialised vehicles, and their design is extremely complex. This book deals with only the hydrodynamics aspects of submarines, and a basic knowledge of ship hydrodynamics is assumed. The principles of submarine geometry are outlined in this chapter, covering those terms which are not common to naval architecture, such as: axisymmetric hull; sail; aft body; fore body; control surfaces; casing; and propulsor. Submarines are very specialised vehicles, and their design is extremely complex. This book deals only with the hydrodynamics aspects of submarines, and a basic knowledge of ship hydrodynamics is assumed. Readers are referred to texts such as Rawson and Tupper (2001) for information about surface ship concepts. Although nuclear powered submarines can be much larger than many surface ships, it is traditional to refer to all submarines as "boats" regardless of their size. This convention is retained in this book.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2541 | | Comments (0)

Introduction to Naval Architecture 5th Ed.

   This latest, fifth edition of the "Introduction to Naval Architecture" by E. C. Tupper was published to provide readers with clear understanding of the basic principles of this science. We all know that the naval architecture involves two different tasks - the first one is the analysis of the various individual characteristics of the ship's design, while the second represents the synthesis of a design from above mentioned elements. This analysis calls upon theories and procedures which were developed over the past years. The book addresses all important matters such as flotation and stability, ship form calculations, definitions used, docking, launching, grounding isues, stability regulations, ship resistance and propulsion, seakeeping, ship environments, vibration, noise and schock, structures, design. ship manoeuvring, various ship types.

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 3693 | | Comments (0)

Handbook of Marine Craft Hydrodynamics and Motion Control

   In the first book released by Wiley on the subject matter in 1994, first attempt was made to bring hydrodynamic modeling and control system design into a unified notation for modeling, control and simulation. The present publication also contains state-of-the-art control design methods for ships as well as for underwater vehicles up to 1994. In the period 1994—2002 a great deal of work was done on nonlinear control of marine craft. This work resulted in many useful results and lecture notes, which have been collected and published in a second book entitled Marine Control Systems: Guidance, Navigation and Control of Ships and Underwater Vehicles. The first edition was published in 2002 and it was used as the main textbook in my course on Guidance and Control at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Instead of making a second edition of the book, I decided to write the Handbook of Marine Craft Hydrodynamics and Motion Control and merge the most important results from my previous two books with recent results. Part I of the book covers both maneuvering and seakeeping theory and it is explained in detail how the equations of motion can be derived for both cases using both frequency- and time-domain formulations. This includes transformations from the frequency to the time domain and the explanation of fluid-memory effects. A great effort has been made in the development of kinematic equations for effective representation of the equations of motion in seakeeping. body, inertial and geographical coordinates. This is very confusing in the existing literature on hydrodynamics and the need to explain this properly motivated me to find a unifying notation for marine and mechanical systems. This was done in the period 2002-2010 and it is inspired by the elegant formulation used in robotics where systems are represented in a vectoriaJ notation. The new results on maneuvering and seakeeping are joint work with Professor Tristan Perez, University of Newcastle, Australia. The work with Professor Perez has resulted in several joint publications and I am grateful to him for numerous interesting discussions on hydrodynamic modeling and control. He should also be thanked for proofreading parts of the manuscript...

Category: NAVAL ARCHITECTURE | Views: 2090 | | Comments (0)

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