Maritime Downloads - Free Maritime Library
Search
Categories
ALERT SERIES
ANATOMY OF THE SHIP SERIES
ASTM & BS EN STANDARDS
BOATBUILDING & BOATING
CARGO HANDLING
CLASS PUBLICATIONS
CLASS RULES & GUIDES
CREW MANAGEMENT
DIGITAL SHIP MAGAZINE
ELECTRICS AND ELECTRONICS
ENGLISH
IACS PUBLICATIONS
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES
ITOPF PUBLICATIONS
LIQUEFIED GASES HANDLING
MARINE ECONOMICS & BUSINESS
MARINE ENGINEERING
MARINE INSURANCE
MARINE REGULATIONS & GUIDES
MARINE SCIENCE & OCEANOGRAPHY
MECHANICS AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
MISCELLANEOUS
NAUTICAL CHARTS & TABLES
NAVAL ARCHITECTURE
NAVAL FICTION
NAVAL HISTORY
NAVIGATION & SEAMANSHIP
NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT
NAVY FLEET
OFFSHORE INDUSTRY
POPULAR
P & I PUBLICATIONS
PRODUCT CATALOGUES
SERVICE AND OPERATION MANUALS - NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT & DP
SERVICE AND OPERATION MANUALS - DIESEL ENGINES
SERVICE AND OPERATION MANUALS - OTHER MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT
SHIPBUILDING & REPAIR
SHIPPING INDUSTRY
SHIPPING LAW
SHIP DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
SHIP HANDLING
SHIP MODELING
SHIP SAFETY & SECURITY
UNDERWATER
YACHTING

V I D E O T R A I N I N G

ALERT SERIES
CARGO HANDLING
ENGLISH
HYDROSTATICS AND STABILITY LECTURES
MARINE ENGINEERING
MARINE POLLUTION PREVENTION
MARITIME LAW
MEGASTRUCTURES SERIES
MIGHTY SHIPS SERIES
NAVAL ARCHITECTURE
NAVAL HISTORY
NAVIGATION LESSONS
NAVY FLEET
OFFSHORE INDUSTRY
PERFORMANCE OF MARINE VEHICLES AT SEA LECTURES
POPULAR
SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA
SHIP SECURITY
SHIP HANDLING
SHIPBUILDING & REPAIR

S O F T W A R E

CARGO HANDLING
ENGLISH
MARINE ENGINEERING
MARINE REGULATIONS
MISCELLANEOUS
NAVIGATION AND SEAMANSHIP
PRODUCT CATALOGUES
SCREENSAVERS
SEAGULL CBT
SERVICE & OPERATION MANUALS
SHIP CONSTRUCTION
SHIP HANDLING/MANAGEMENT
SIMULATORS
Counter
Онлайн всего: 16
Гостей: 16
Пользователей: 0
Welcome, Guest · RSS

· Main »
1 2 »

Bridge Procedures - Bridge Resource Management - Navigational Charts & Associated Publications

   One of the parts of Bridge Procedures series discussed voyage/passage planning and demonstrates the use of charts. This video, in turn, deals with the navigation charts and associated nautical publications. Charts are vital, both for passage or voyage planning as well as for navigation. A chart is the prime aid and even the most efficient bridge team cannot function effectively without up-to-date actual chart. But the chart starts getting outdated the very moment it is printed, because the environment is constantly changing. The commonest changes are man-made, such as the buoys, lights, and new obstructions, they all may present a danger to the ship, together with the additional work and stress for the people on the bridge. The nautical press regularly releases the reports on the vessels which have faced problems related to charts - no charts, wrong charts, unofficial charts, or charts not kept up-to-date. To take one example - while waiting for the berth at quay side, the master of the motor tanker Marion decided to anchor. The charts have not been corrected, and the ship put the anchor down on a new pipeline, severely damaging it. The ship owners had to pay about twenty-five million dollars to the owners of the pipeline, as a result... And this is just one example demonstrating the importance of maintaining the charts up-to-date, correct and official...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 192 | | Comments (0)

Bridge Procedures - Voyage Planning.
   This video is going to examine one of the key tasks on the ship - voyage planning by the navigating officer. A good voyage plan with all the information including information needed in emergencies, is the only basis for a safe voyage. Poor voyage planning may not always result in an accident, but it puts the watchkeeping officer in a weak position if the things are starting to go wrong, and inevitable they will one day. As well as reducing accidents and improving safety, regulation 34 of SOLAS Chapter V requires all ships to have a voyage plan before proceeding to sea. The information it gives frees the watchkeeping officer from spending time on reference books and tables, it will ensure that the officer is fully aware of all requirements. The plan is to cover the entire voyage from berth to berth. It must be completed well before the departure and must be approved by the master. If the voyage plan is your responsibility, you need to be aware that doing it properly takes time. The first step is to check that all the necessary charts and publications are up-to-date and that no change is taking place to the scheduled destination. Next, there must be a discussion with the master to take into account all the commercial requirements. The master's experience will enable him to suggest a route, pointing out potential hazards. One issue to discuss with the master is weather routing...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2280 | | Comments (0)

Bridge Procedures - Working With VTS.
   As an extension to the areas covered by the other parts of the present video training program, this video film examined the key principles involved in working with the VTS. While approaching or leaving a port, the onboard management team need to interact with many shore-based organizations. If their own management style is synergistic, this may eliminate difficulties in including the additional temporary members into the team. This will ease everyone's workload and contribute to the more efficient and incident-free turnaround. One of the most important for the shore based authorities is the VTS, standing for the vessel traffic service. On board, the pilot serves as a link between the VTS and the vessel; however, the ship's responsible officers must be ready to deal with the VTS should a need for that arise. Both the VTS operator and the ship's officer have the qualities they can bring to the task. Those on board know the ship and it's characteristics, they know the crew, they know detailed plan for the immediate future; but they do not often have a global view of the traffic situation. The advantages of the VTS operators are that they do see the overall picture and everything that is happening in the port, they know the schedules and intention of the ships, they know the area very well and are aware of the capabilities of the availability of the shore-based services, including emergency services, and also know how to contact them...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2110 | | Comments (0)

Bridge Procedures - Bridge Watchkeeping.
   The work of the navigating offices goes on winter and summer, day and night, in calm weather and in storm. This applies equally whether engaged in passage planning, taking the watch or entering or leaving confined waters. It is a critical work as over eighty percent of insured losses due to collision, grounding or contact damage, are set to arise from human error. This program examined the work of the officer on the watch during watchkeeping. Any shipping casualty, whether it is by grounding, collision or fire, represents an enormous cost to the maritime community. In addition to the possible losses and environmental damage, all other factors involved affect all ships. However, most shipping casualties are actually avoidable. Analysis of statistics shows that up to eighty percent of losses are due to human error and that often means bridgekeeping error. Bridge watchkeeping is deservedly considered one of the critically important activities on board of ship at sea. While on watch, the responsibility for safety and security of the vessel and all people on board is on the watchkeeping officer. This task requires good training, high standard of skills, and effective time management. The rime task of the watchkeeping officer is to ensure that the vessel is never in a position of uncontrollable risk. This means always knowing the ship's situation and keeping a good lookout at all times...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 4084 | | Comments (2)

Bridge Procedures - Emergency Procedures.
   This series considers a number of important issues in bridge resource management. This particular video is dedicated to the bridge response to the emergency situations. Everyone has heard of the shipping accidents that have grabbed the headlines of the world's maritime press. But the world at large never hears about the incidents that were contained and controlled by those on board. By responding quickly and correctly, many emergencies have been brought under control. Injury, loss of time, and damage to the ship have been greatly reduced and eliminated. Although the offices on the watch has a vital role to play initiating the ship's response to any incident, the primary responsibility remains with the safe navigation of the ship. During the watch, the watchkeeping officer is in charge of the ship. Most of the time, normal routine work will fill every minute of the watch. It is only rarely that emergencies occur, but when they do occur, your response as the watchkeeping officer is a crucial component in dealing with it. How you respond, depend on the requirements of your companies' emergency response manual. We show here a number of typical examples, starting with the gyro failure. On hearing the alarm, the officer on the watch switches to the second gyro, if one is available...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2256 | | Comments (0)

Bridge Procedures - Accident Prevention - The Human Factor.
   Parts of the present Bridge Procedures series discuss bridge watchkeeping and the master-pilot relationship. As the extension to these topics, this video examines the importance of the human factor in accident prevention. Accidents will happen at sea, on land, and in the air. When they do, the usual response is to find someone to blame and often the person chosen is the watchkeeper in charge. But this approach misses the point; to improve safety, we need to look beyond - it means taking into account the human factor. As far as the shipping industry is concerned, this means turning away from the old-fashioned autocratic leadership style, that was widely spread in the past. Perhaps that was once an effective management style; but on high technology ships sailing in today's busy sea load it is no longer appropriate. The airline industry has been aware of this for some time, but it took a terrible accident to change a perception of the effective management... In short, it is quite obvious that the human roles have always been and are still being considered one of the most serious factors contributing to the number of the accidents, including but not limited to the accidents happening at sea. This is what the present video concentrates on...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2022 | | Comments (0)

Anchoring safely

   Here is the officially released video training file dedicated to the problems of the anchoring and mainly addressing larger vessels. From Hong Kong to Rotterdam, Singapore to New York, the past twenty years have seen a massive increase in world trade and, with it, the volume of world shipping. Too frequently amended schedules and orders has been added even more time at anchor, waiting for berths to become free, demanding ever more care for masters, crews and pilots concerned for the safety of their vessels. For the past twenty years have seen over a thousand anchor related incidents, mainly among the largest vessels. Anchors have been let go in the wrong place, at the wrong time, in the wrong way... the costs, expenditures and equipment is immense and poses the awkward question - do those responsible properly understand the basic design principles and limitations of their anchoring equipment? In addressing this question head on and since most reported incidents have been aboard the large vessels, our program looks closely at two separate anchorings aboard the same bulk carrier plying between Europe and North America. In illustrating here what is best in anchoring practice, we should also point out the pit falls for ships of all sizes...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 819 | | Comments (0)

Working With Tugs (Video)

   The deck of a tug is not the easiest place to work. Waves, winds and strong tides, weather conditions and heavy equipment combine to make it a difficult and sometimes dangerous place. But the work done is invaluable. In today's shipping market, the size of vesselss is increasing faster than the ports can accommodate. Harbor operations are becoming more complex. Time pressures and increasing traffic are making ever greating demands on tugs. To meet the challenge, tug crews depend on the professionalism of the vessel's crews. Good teamwork between everyone involved is essential... This training film supplements the training booklet on working on tugs.

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 697 | | Comments (0)

Target Tracking Devices (Video)

   The present training video film was developed to supplement this training booklet and with the ultimate intention to provide a proper introduction to the major technologies making up Target Tracking Devices and to describe how they relate to each other. The technologies described are the ARPA, AIS and ECDIS. The training is primarily intended for the deck team - both junior and senior officers. Radar sweeping the surrounding sea, pinpointing ships, coastlines, every sweep plotting a new situation; by combining this information with data on your own course and speed, it has long been possible to create a vector triangle identifying any targets. In busy shipping lanes with dozens of vessels showing the same sea space and some vessels travelling at high speeds, calculations need to be swift and accurate.

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 542 | | Comments (0)

Anchoring of Vessels

   The short, only six-minute long training video produced by KARCO. It will show the basics of the anchoring techniques. This animation can be used as supplementary material for classes as the information in it is presented in very clear and easily understandable way.

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 1835 | | Comments (0)

Mooring Operation

   This short training video film was prepared by Seagull. It is known by everyone dealing with seafaring that the mooring and anchoring operations are one of the most critical and hazardous tasks routinely carried out on ships. Mooring arrangements, mooring equipment and weather conditions differ from port to port and careful pre-planning before any mooring operation is essential...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2872 | | Comments (0)

BridgeHelper for Android

   The Bridge Helper is just the COLREG version optimized in order to be used on the mobile devices. The Android version contains all regulations and other important data. Download this program to your mobile phone or any other android-based device and you will be able to look into the book at any time without having to stand up and opening the paper publications. Info on flags and lights also inside. Search is possible and will save you so much time. Again, as usual, no installation, completely free, no activation or cracks. You will definitely find it very handy.

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2023 | | Comments (0)

Bunkering Procedures

   There are places for gambling, for taking a bit of the chance - the sea is not one of them. Break the rules here, ignore them, get careless - and the results could be devastating. Don't take chances! One anaysis of marine pollution claims showed that 37 % of the pollution were caused by bunker spills. Those spills resulted in claims with tens of millions of dollars. If you are dealing with oil, then you might al well be dealing with a dynamite...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 1552 | | Comments (0)

Automatic Identification System

   This short video describes the principles of AIS (Automatic Identification System). It is quite clear that in the weather conditions with poor visibility there can be many dangerous situation affecting safety of navigation. A way to avoid dangerous situations is to present information about other ships such as position, heading, speed, and name on the display. The technology already exists and it is called AIS...

Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 1608 | | Comments (0)

Dynamic positioning
   Dynamic Positioning, or DP, is the system which keeps the vessel automatically in position with the help of active thrusts. The system utilizes thrusters, rudders, and propellers to withstand the external forces like the wind or waves. Dynamic positioning was first used in the 1960-es and has since that been improved to better serve the offshore industry.
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 3302 | | Comments (0)


   Recently, accidents that have resulted in losses of anchors together with entire length of anchor cables, have been increasing while ships were attempting to anchor. Accidents involving ships lying at anchor have also repeatedly occurred. Most of these accidents involved drifting, collision and standing caused by dragging anchor. We will study how to prevent drifting due to dragging anchor while lying at anchor and loss of anchor and it's cable while attempting to anchor.
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 3942 | | Comments (0)

Meteorology for safe navigation in tropical and extratropical cyclones
   Strong winds and heavy seas caused by fully developed tropical cyclone... Tropical cyclones and typhoons sometimes dominate the seas with devastating forces. What is expected for navigators to ensure safe and economical voyages in such an environment?..
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2504 | | Comments (0)

Ship handling in following seas - How to avoid dangerous following seas
   It is well known that when the ship is sailing in following and quartering seas, the ship's motions will be augmented and so the possibility of the capsizing will be increased. It is therefore important to possess more detailed knowledge about these risks for safer navigation in following and quartering seas. The ship handling techniques that we are studying here are also available in the International Maritime Organization Circular "Guidance to the Master for avoiding dangering situations in following and quartering seas."
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2690 | | Comments (0)

Maneuverability of pure car carriers - wind effects
   The Pure Car Carriers (Car ferries), are characterized as special ships form with relatively high freeboard that have a very large area of the hull and superstructure above the water level as compared to that of the underwater hull. Therefore, the wind has great influence on the ship hull, and the wave from the bow has also much impact on the large flare of the bow. In addition, incidents of dragging anchor due to strong winds also take place while anchoring such vessels.
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 3226 | | Comments (0)

Ship handling in head and countering seas
   When a ship navigates in head seas, it's hull is subjected to sever shocks which induce violent ship motions. As well trained and experienced navigators, we are able to respond to this by altering the ship's course and speed as required. However, to accomplish safe navigation in head seas, it's advisable to have more reliable ship handling techniques backed by theoretical knowledge as to why these phenomena are created and how to avoid the generation of these critical effects in addition to possessing sea-going experience.
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2315 | | Comments (0)

Ship handling in restricted waters - Ship squat and shallow water effects
   Narrow passages and fairways in rivers and canals with a navigable depth or width comparatively small in relation to the draught or breadth of transiting ships are called restricted waters. The maneuverability of ships navigating through such restricted will be effected by peculiar hydrodynamic effects that are different from those when ships navigate in broad and deep waters...
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 3916 | | Comments (0)


   This video highlights the effects that these passages can impose on a ship's manoeuvring characteristics. When entering shallow water and having to pass other ships or move in close proximity to banks, any ship (regardless of size) may be heavily influenced by the induced hydrodynamic effects. So much so that in some cases collisions and groundings can result.
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 3107 | | Comments (0)

Ship handling in restricted waters - In harbor ship handling
   In harbours and ports where manoeuvring areas are confined and shallow, there are many navigational restrictions. Therefore ship operators are required to manoeuver their vessels in accordance with the environmental situation. Additionally, when the entering and leaving the ports also involve berthing and unberthing operations, ship handling without assistance is not easy. This difficulty is due to the problem of directional control and coursekeeping, a direct result of poor steerability at low speed and the influence of wind and current.
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2835 | | Comments (3)

Maneuverability of very large ships
   In accordance with the request of the industrial world for the rationalization of transporting and procuring expenses, large sized ships have been developed primarily in bulk carriers and crude oil tankers. In particular, the cause of transportation per voyage has been reduced because wide beam very large ships have been placed and commissioned. On the other hand, these very large ships have still more magnified the maneuvering characteristics with good turning ability but poor course keeping ability...
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2212 | | Comments (1)

Keeping up standards - ship vetting inspection for bulk oil carriers
   For the ship inspector, every inspection is a test of his professional judgment. First impressions can make a difference but it is only a surface thing. If the ship does not give an overall cosmetic appearance of being perfect, it does not necessarily mean that it is a bad ship at all... Ship vetting is important to everyone because it helps to improve the quality of shipping operations. Poor quality ships endanger the lives of their crew, they can lead to pollution incidents that cost millions and millions of dollars...
Category: SHIP HANDLING | Views: 2305 | | Comments (0)

1-25 26-27
Copyright Libramar © 2017 Free web hostinguCoz